Out with the New, In with the Old

A delicate chiffon dress hanging in a shop window catches your eye. It’s unlike anything you’ve seen on display in conventional retailers; yet, it’s still strikingly familiar. Was it from the pages of your grandmother’s photo album? Perhaps you recall it from a black-and-white in a history textbook? You simply must investigate. Stepping into the storefront induces a further nostalgic flashback, captivating the senses as you handle each piece. The attention to detail, the elegant fabric — it’s a fashionable blast from the past. You then discover that swathing your skin in a tailor-made 1930s gown is far more exhilarating than size-hoping in the cookie-cutter styles overflowing from department store racks. It’s these aspects of vintage in an industry booming with mast-produced clothing that induce a craving for uniqueness.

Divine Decadence Originals
“More people are buying vintage because more of what is being offered out there is not enough to satisfy their needs,” says Carmelita Blondet, owner of Divine Decadence Originals. Blondet’s customers include brides, prom queens and celebrities, demonstrating that vintage appeals to all demographics, especially those hunting for rare gems hiding beyond the borders of mass-produced fashion.
www.divinedecadenceoriginals.com

69 Vintage Collective
“In a time of disposable fashion, I think there is always going to be a population of people who feel that fast fashion doesn’t represent quality for them,” says Kealan Sullivan of 69 Vintage. Sullivan has built a following that seeks a 100 per cent vintage shopping experience with a wide range of carefully tailored options.
www.69vintage.com

I Miss You
Julie Yoo, owner of I Miss You, is very particular about the quality of the pieces that she brings into her store. “I look for things that would have been featured in the pages of Vogue at the time,” Yoo says. “Just because it’s old doesn’t mean I’m going to buy it.”
www.imissyou.ca

Out with the New, In with the Old

A delicate chiffon dress hanging in a shop window catches your eye. It’s unlike anything you’ve seen on display in conventional retailers; yet, it’s still strikingly familiar. Was it from the pages of your grandmother’s photo album? Perhaps you recall it from a black-and-white in a history textbook? You simply must investigate. Stepping into the storefront induces a further nostalgic flashback, captivating the senses as you handle each piece. The attention to detail, the elegant fabric — it’s a fashionable blast from the past. You then discover that swathing your skin in a tailor-made 1930s gown is far more exhilarating than size-hoping in the cookie-cutter styles overflowing from department store racks. It’s these aspects of vintage in an industry booming with mast-produced clothing that induce a craving for uniqueness.

Divine Decadence Originals
“More people are buying vintage because more of what is being offered out there is not enough to satisfy their needs,” says Carmelita Blondet, owner of Divine Decadence Originals. Blondet’s customers include brides, prom queens and celebrities, demonstrating that vintage appeals to all demographics, especially those hunting for rare gems hiding beyond the borders of mass-produced fashion.
www.divinedecadenceoriginals.com

69 Vintage Collective
“In a time of disposable fashion, I think there is always going to be a population of people who feel that fast fashion doesn’t represent quality for them,” says Kealan Sullivan of 69 Vintage. Sullivan has built a following that seeks a 100 per cent vintage shopping experience with a wide range of carefully tailored options.
www.69vintage.com

I Miss You
Julie Yoo, owner of I Miss You, is very particular about the quality of the pieces that she brings into her store. “I look for things that would have been featured in the pages of Vogue at the time,” Yoo says. “Just because it’s old doesn’t mean I’m going to buy it.”
www.imissyou.ca

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Cassandra Tatone

Cassandra Tatone