The New Luxury

Canadian chef Daniel Burns wins Michelin star for his New York restaurant Luksus, a Scandinavian-style bistro that focuses on seasonal ingredients, experimentation and beer

Restaurants in Canada may not get love from the Michelin Guide, but our culinary exports certainly turn heads. Halifax-born chef Daniel Burns was one of two Canadians in New York City (along with Hugue Dufour and his M. Wells Steakhouse) to earn a coveted Michelin star this year. In the small, rustic space tucked behind international brew house Tørst, Burns’ restaurant, Luksus, is a Scandinavian-style bistro that takes what he learned from his time at Noma, Restaurant magazine’s Best Restaurant in the World, and applies it to North American fare. His inventive set menu results from much experimentation and changes every four to five weeks, and is as delicious as it is artistic. Burns focuses on only one or two seasonal ingredients per plate to let their “bright, clean flavours” shine. Dishes feature outside-the-box combinations such as squab breast with glazed purple carrots and salted plum purée, and come with an optional beer pairing — no wine here. Luksus means “luxury” in Danish and is a play on words about how Burns views modern fine dining. “I don’t think it means white tablecloths and French service exactly anymore. It can be something else.” If this is the new direction of fine dining, count us in.

The New Luxury

Canadian chef Daniel Burns wins Michelin star for his New York restaurant Luksus, a Scandinavian-style bistro that focuses on seasonal ingredients, experimentation and beer

Restaurants in Canada may not get love from the Michelin Guide, but our culinary exports certainly turn heads. Halifax-born chef Daniel Burns was one of two Canadians in New York City (along with Hugue Dufour and his M. Wells Steakhouse) to earn a coveted Michelin star this year. In the small, rustic space tucked behind international brew house Tørst, Burns’ restaurant, Luksus, is a Scandinavian-style bistro that takes what he learned from his time at Noma, Restaurant magazine’s Best Restaurant in the World, and applies it to North American fare. His inventive set menu results from much experimentation and changes every four to five weeks, and is as delicious as it is artistic. Burns focuses on only one or two seasonal ingredients per plate to let their “bright, clean flavours” shine. Dishes feature outside-the-box combinations such as squab breast with glazed purple carrots and salted plum purée, and come with an optional beer pairing — no wine here. Luksus means “luxury” in Danish and is a play on words about how Burns views modern fine dining. “I don’t think it means white tablecloths and French service exactly anymore. It can be something else.” If this is the new direction of fine dining, count us in.

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