New Science Meets Old School

Dolce Magazine chats with Person of Interest star Michael Emerson about his new PBS show, fashion and folk art.

Dolce: The Mystery of Matter: Search For The Elements premiered this August. Tell us a bit about your experience as the show’s host. What did you personally learn through the process about the history of science?
Michael Emerson: I learned a great deal working on that show — most of the science was new to me and the performance of the experiments was an unexpected challenge. I stand amazed at the early scientists who made these discoveries with such simple tools. Their work seems like a religion of sorts.

D: Are you a fan of art? If so, which artist or painting are you drawn to?
ME: I was a draftsman for many years so I am drawn to black and white drawings and etchings. Over the years I’ve learned to love folk artists from around the world — the simplicity, colour and sometimes profundity of it.

D: Do you collect anything in specific?
ME: Folk art — masks, carvings, textiles, etc.

D: How would you describe your personal fashion style?
ME: Old school. Tailored. Retro.

D: Favourite fashion designer, and why?
ME: Many favourites — Hugo Boss, Freemans Sporting Club, Paul Stuart, Isaia, Kenzo.

D: Favourite wine?
ME: A sake — Izumi Judan from Dewazakura Brewery.

D: Favourite car?
ME: Too many to name — Checker cab, ’65 Mustang, ’57 Chevrolet, Dodge Challenger, Tesla. I could go on.

D: What book is on your nightstand at the moment?
ME: Complete Poems of W.B. Yeats.

D: Over the years you’ve become kind of a big deal. Did you anticipate a successful career in acting while you were a magazine illustrator?
ME: I didn’t anticipate any career at all. I wondered a lot if I would find a real calling in this life. When I began acting I felt I had an answer and it was such a relief to simply know what to do.

D: What has been the most challenging part of your journey so far? Was there a particular fear or obstacle you had to overcome?
ME: Like other actors I fear failure and embarrassment and unpreparedness. In my work there is a battle with exhaustion and distraction.

D: What is your favourite place to retreat to after a long day at work?
ME: A nicely lit bar and then home.

New Science Meets Old School

Dolce Magazine chats with Person of Interest star Michael Emerson about his new PBS show, fashion and folk art.

Dolce: The Mystery of Matter: Search For The Elements premiered this August. Tell us a bit about your experience as the show’s host. What did you personally learn through the process about the history of science?
Michael Emerson: I learned a great deal working on that show — most of the science was new to me and the performance of the experiments was an unexpected challenge. I stand amazed at the early scientists who made these discoveries with such simple tools. Their work seems like a religion of sorts.

D: Are you a fan of art? If so, which artist or painting are you drawn to?
ME: I was a draftsman for many years so I am drawn to black and white drawings and etchings. Over the years I’ve learned to love folk artists from around the world — the simplicity, colour and sometimes profundity of it.

D: Do you collect anything in specific?
ME: Folk art — masks, carvings, textiles, etc.

D: How would you describe your personal fashion style?
ME: Old school. Tailored. Retro.

D: Favourite fashion designer, and why?
ME: Many favourites — Hugo Boss, Freemans Sporting Club, Paul Stuart, Isaia, Kenzo.

D: Favourite wine?
ME: A sake — Izumi Judan from Dewazakura Brewery.

D: Favourite car?
ME: Too many to name — Checker cab, ’65 Mustang, ’57 Chevrolet, Dodge Challenger, Tesla. I could go on.

D: What book is on your nightstand at the moment?
ME: Complete Poems of W.B. Yeats.

D: Over the years you’ve become kind of a big deal. Did you anticipate a successful career in acting while you were a magazine illustrator?
ME: I didn’t anticipate any career at all. I wondered a lot if I would find a real calling in this life. When I began acting I felt I had an answer and it was such a relief to simply know what to do.

D: What has been the most challenging part of your journey so far? Was there a particular fear or obstacle you had to overcome?
ME: Like other actors I fear failure and embarrassment and unpreparedness. In my work there is a battle with exhaustion and distraction.

D: What is your favourite place to retreat to after a long day at work?
ME: A nicely lit bar and then home.

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